15 September 2008

Big Horn Expedition

Because I'm too lazy to actually write something this week, I thought I'd inflict some pictures from my Sunday hike in the Big Horn National Forest on you. This was me time, no dogs, just the mountains, the lake, the trees, and one brain-numb city escapee.


The goal - Tie Hack Reservoir. One of numerous little lakes tucked in the Big Horns, and easily accessible after a small hike. Good for when you need some nature, but don't want to actually work real hard at it. Since putting one foot in front of the other was all I was capable of that day, it was the ideal destination.


I intended to sketch and paint, but just hanging out was far more attractive, and required little brain power. Note to self: Self, remember to find a lighter sketchbook, preferably one without a hardcover so the day pack doesn't gain weight with every step...


Water. Lots of water. Pretty blue water, with lots of fish in it, at least where I was sitting. I could see the trout pop to the surface to snatch bugs. The fisherman a few hundred yards to my right wasn't having much luck. Maybe he should have used granola instead of worms.

The rock on top looked interestingly enough like a mountain lion head. The chipmunks that came around to beg for some trail mix didn't seem very intimidated though...


I heard elk somewhere in the vicinity, but never saw any. There was a lot of tracks and droppings everywhere, which lead to the Corgis sniffing my boots thoroughly once I got home, and giving me dirty looks for not taking them to smell the smells firsthand.


A nice piece of level ground to traverse. I enjoyed it while it lasted, which wasn't long.


I forgot one thing about hiking. When you hike in, you also have to hike out again. I don't remember a big downhill on the way in, but the uphill on the way out about kicked my butt. I was glad to see my poor car waiting patiently for me at the end of the trail, not to mention my extra water and my "No service in this area" cell phone.


Yes, that's snow on the mountains. I didn't go that far up into the Big Horns, I was only at 7500 feet (2286m), it was warm with just a bit of a nip in the air, a promise of things to come. Hopefully, I can get a few more hikes in before what's on the mountains ends up on the roads, and my communing with nature comes to an end - for a while.

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10 comments:

Carla said...

Fantastic scenery. 2286m is higher than anything in Britain. How long is a "small hike"?

Gabriele C. said...

There's some beautiful landscape hiding in Wyoming. :)

kc heath said...

I want to cry, your photos are so beautiful! I miss the mountains terribly at times like this.

I remember reading somewhere that most mountaineering accidents happen on the downward part of the journey because we pay closer attention when we want to reach our goal and when we're tired and going back is when stumbles can occur--so don't forget that next time, okay?

Sure wish I could have gone with you.... [it would have been much better than sitting in a dark overheated room with no plumbing! :)

Constance said...

Carla, it was only a mile or so in to the lake from where I parked, then I took a three mile detour around exploring, then hiked back out.

Constance said...

Gabriele, I wish it would stay hidden! :)

Constance said...

KC, since I had no goal except get away from people, I should have been okay. :) And yes, it sure beat waiting out a hurricane!

Anonymous said...

Beautiful country!
Great pics!

FYI....I see one of your labels was "Mental Health Day".

Any state employee worth the shovel they lean on knows that a "Mental Health Day" is when you call in sick on a workday.
Didn't we teach you anything? :)

Calder said...

Beautiful scenery and photos, you are blessed!!

Smiles!!

Constance said...

Anon, I don't make a very good state worker despite your teachings, do I? I'd work harder at not working, but that would violate the core of state workerdom. You see my dilemma? Besides, I don't lean on a shovel, I lean on a computer....

signed, yer geeky little sister.

Constance said...

Calder - thank you!